In recent years, CBD has generated a tremendous amount of interest among consumers, clinicians, and scientists. Why? Not only does evidence suggest CBD counteracts many of THC’s adverse effects, but numerous animal studies and accumulating evidence from human experimental, clinical, and epidemiological studies suggest CBD has powerful anti-anxiety properties. Administered acutely (“as needed”), it appears safe, well-tolerated, and may be beneficial to treat a number of anxiety-related disorders, including:
OK, so CBD oil won't get you high, turn you into a drug addict, or give you the munchies, so why is everyone talking about it? If THC is the Beyoncé of cannabinoids, then CBD is the Adele: Both you and your grandma will love it. CBD is just as talented as THC but safe for the whole family. CBD oil can provide amazing health benefits naturally, and there is a growing body of research to support it.

While there are more unknowns than knowns at this point, Grant says he doesn’t discount all the anecdotal CBD reports. “You hear somebody say, ‘Hey, I gave this to myself and my kid and we feel a lot better,’ and we should never dismiss that kind of information,” he says. He points out that many modern medicines were discovered when researchers followed up on exactly this sort of human trial-and-error evidence. “But we still need to do the studies that confirm whether all the good things are true, and how much to give, and how to give it,” he says. “These are all questions that need to be answered.”


My mother has dementia/Alzheimers along with a broken knee that they will not repair do to her mental status. She is currently in a nursing home. I firmly believe her mental situation began with the over use of hydrocodone for over 30 years and was acerbated by the trauma of breaking and disconnecting her knee cap. Since weaning her off of her meds (still in progress) we have regained much of her consciousness. I want to try CBD to help in her recovery or to help slow down the disease. I cannot find a dosage recommendation plus the nursing home/doctor does not recommend it. I would need to give it to her when I am there visiting (about 3 - 4 times per week). Is there a recommended dosage for dementia/Alzheimers?
I felt like many other users – afraid and nervous to take a dose of something that is supposed to take away my nervousness and anxiety. I use PureKana Vanilla 300mg. I’ve used it off and on for about a month. I started with 3-4 drops to get my body use to it and I noticed that the first night I tried it I ended up sitting on the couch watching t.v. not thinking about whether or not I was feeling ok – I just was. My bf asked how I was feeling and I was just feeling good – normal – calm. The next time, I took 4 – 6 drops but my anxiety overpowered the oil. I was going into a stressful work situation and even though I tried to attack the issue before I thought it would happen I ended up having an anxiety attack until I removed myself from the loud crowd and sat in nature with quietness. It was very discouraging at that point. I decided to give it a break and a week later I felt my stomach butterflies and ‘off’ feeling happening. I took 6 drops and sat outside where I was comfortable with a book and water. I ended up feeling fine and my anxiety just melted away without me realizing it. I think cbd oil is a great natural way to treat anxiety but go into it open-minded. It may work right away but sometimes the situation could outweigh the small dose and you just need more for a more stressful situation. I still believe in the power of the plant. It was put on this earth for a reason – to help!
HV = healthy volunteers; DBP = double-blind placebo; SAD = social anxiety disorder; HC = healthy controls; THC = Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol; STAI = Spielberger’s state trait anxiety inventory; VAMS = visual analog mood scale; BP = blood pressure; SPST = simulated public speaking test; SCR = skin conductance response; SPECT = single-photon emission computed tomography; SSPS-N = negative self-evaluation subscale; HR = heart rate; VAS = visual analog scale, CBD = cannabidiol
Unknown long-term: The long-term effects of cannabidiol aren’t well understood. In just the past few years, the substance has received more mainstream attention and is increasing in popularity.  As more scientific studies support its safety and efficacy as a treatment for medical conditions, more data will be gathered from long-term users.  As of now, we aren’t sure whether there could be any detrimental long-term effects of cannabidiol – especially when used by minors.
“It can affect everything from emotion to pain to appetite to energy metabolism to brain function to even the immune system and inflammation,” says Hector Lopez, M.D., a consultant to PlusCBD Oil, one of the top-selling brands. “When you have a system that cross talks with all those pathways, then there are very few things the endocannabinoid system does not influence.”
Although delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (known as THC) is the primary psychoactive ingredient, other known compounds with biologic activity are cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabichromene, cannabigerol, tetrahydrocannabivarin and delta-8-THC. Cannabidiol (CBD) is thought to have significant pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory activity without the psychoactive effect of delta-9-THC. (2)
During my visit, Penny showed me how she administers Harper’s CBD oils. We stood in her kitchen, where a window opened onto a vista of green grass and a wooden swing set out back. After carefully mixing and measuring Harper’s oils, Penny poured the liquid into a jumbo-sized plastic syringe. “We put this all online,” she told me, referring to the several YouTube videos she has made to help other parents administer hemp oil. Penny leaned down over her daughter to fit the tip of the syringe into her gastronomy tube, and I stood by silently. Harper looked at Penny, and Penny smiled back at her, and eased the plunger down.
A study published by Blessing et al. (2015) evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of cannabidiol in the treatment of anxiety disorders.  Researchers compiled and assessed evidence from preclinical, experimental, clinical, and epidemiological publications.  This report concluded that preclinical evidence supports the usage of CBD as a potential intervention for anxiety disorders.
Research works in this aspect are inclining in the favor of CBD for alleviation of insomnia. For example, a study carried out in the year 2006 revealed that cannabidiol (CBD), which is the second important constituent of cannabis, and is non-psychoactive in nature, may have an impact on the sleep mechanism of rats. It was shown to increase alertness with light, and had no particular impact on sleep with the lights off. This provides an insight that CBD could be brought into use for therapeutic relief of day-time somnolence, and hence, can this way improve night-time sleep.
For instance, some people report a sense of calm and peace; others report increased anxiety levels and unpleasant sensations. The intensity of these symptoms will largely depend on an individual’s body composition. In addition, marijuana strains feature different levels of oil concentration that also determines the intensity of the outcomes that a user feels after consumption. Some strains are recommended to produce less profound symptoms and reactions.
When is the best time to take the CBD for sleep problems? The local “authority” maintains that it must be taken in 3 doses throughout the day or will have no effect whatsoever, but I find nothing online to substantiate this claim. Can it be taken as a supplement to prescription medications for sleep disorders? All sites say to consult your physician but physicians (and pharmacists) claim to know nothing about CBD.
According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, cannabis use for medicinal purposes dates back at least 3,000 years. It was introduced into Western medicine in the 1840s by W.B. O’Shaughnessy, a surgeon who learned of its medicinal properties while working in India for the British East Indies Co. It became useful because of its analgesic, sedative, anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmodic and anti-convulsant effects.
@parus i just got my certification for medical marijuana. Upon buying what was recommended I was given CBD oil, I’ve not been on it a week yet today will be my fourth day of using it. It takes about 1/2 hour to work but it seems to help. They also gave me a cannabinol patch to use at night fir the severe itch in my head from the shingles. Also a vape two puffs as needed for the itch break through which I have not tried yet. I’m a bit anxious about using it.
Following cloning of the endogenous receptor for THC, namely the CB1R, endogenous CB1R ligands, or “endocannabinoids” (eCBs) were discovered, namely anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (reviewed in [22]). The CB1R is an inhibitory Gi/o protein-coupled receptor that is mainly localized to nerve terminals, and is expressed on both γ-aminobutryic acid-ergic and glutamatergic neurons. eCBs are fatty acid derivatives that are synthesized on demand in response to neuronal depolarization and Ca2+ influx, via cleavage of membrane phospholipids. The primary mechanism by which eCBs regulate synaptic function is retrograde signaling, wherein eCBs produced by depolarization of the postsynaptic neuron activate presynaptic CB1Rs, leading to inhibition of neurotransmitter release [23]. The “eCB system” includes AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; their respective degradative enzymes fatty acid amide hydroxylase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase; the CB1R and related CB2 receptor (the latter expressed mainly in the periphery); as well as several other receptors activated by eCBs, including the TRPV1 receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and G protein-coupled 55 receptor, which functionally interact with CB1R signaling (reviewed in [21, 24]). Interactions with the TRPV1 receptor, in particular, appear to be critical in regulating the extent to which eCB release leads to inhibition or facilitation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release [25]. The TRPV1 receptor is a postsynaptic cation channel that underlies sensation of noxious heat in the periphery, with capsacin (hot chili) as an exogenous ligand. TRPV1 receptors are also expressed in the brain, including the amygdala, periaqueductal grey, hippocampus, and other areas [26, 27].
I decided to try CBD when I was withdrawing from Tramadol, a synthetic opiate I had been taking for pain (with 2 other medications) for over a year. As I began slowly reducing my use, I experienced a lot of anxiety and muscle tremors in my legs especially. I know that using a marijuana medication meant that my pain doctor would not prescribe for me again, but I was getting off the pain medications one by one anyway, so I don't care.

Long-term outcomes: There are zero long-term studies investigating the safety, efficacy, and long-term effects of CBD as a treatment for anxiety. Data from animal model studies suggests that chronic CBD usage could yield deleterious epigenetic and/or neuropsychiatric effects. However, it is unclear as to whether administration of CBD at a normative (non-chronic) frequency would maintain therapeutic efficacy over a long-term.


General health improvement: Intermittent usage of CBD oil on an “as-needed” basis is understood to provide numerous general health benefits. Research suggests that CBD oil may offer anticancer, analgesic, and antiemetic properties.  There’s evidence noting that it may boost immune function, slow the growth of bacteria, reduce muscle spasms, and modulate blood sugar levels.  Literature indicates that cannabidiol may be conducive to general health.
In 1937, the U.S. Treasury Department introduced the Marihuana Tax Act, which imposed a levy of $1 per ounce for medicinal use of cannabis and $100 per ounce for recreational use. This was opposed by physicians who were not required to pay a special tax for prescribing cannabis, use special order forms to obtain it and keep records detailing its professional use. The American Medical Association believed that evidence of cannabis’ harmful effects was limited and the act would prevent further research into its medicinal worth.
“By smoking weed, you suppress the REM sleep, and with that you also suppress a lot of important functions of that REM sleep. One of those functions is reliving the things you have experienced and coming to terms with them, as it were. Processing all kinds of psychological influences is something you do in REM sleep. You also anticipate the things that will happen the next day or the days after that. While you're sleeping, you already consider those and make decisions in advance."
Multiple types of anxiety: A limitation associated with CBD research is that it hasn’t been tested extensively among patients with a specific diagnostic subtype of anxiety (e.g. generalized anxiety). That said, studies note that CBD is likely efficacious in treating symptoms of many different types of anxiety including: social phobia, PTSD, panic disorder, OCD, and generalized anxiety disorder.  Therefore, individuals may derive anxiolytic benefit from CBD – regardless of their specific type of anxiety.
The ACMPR requires that all Licensed Producers display total levels of potential THC and CBD on their product labels. Total potential THC is the total amount of THC available when all THCa (tetrahydrocannabinolic acid) is decarboxylated. Total potential CBD is the total of CBD available when all the CBDa (Cannabidiolic acid) is decarboxylated. Learn more about decarboxylation here.
Our Editor’s Pick is the tincture from CBDistillery. This tincture is available in five strengths ranging from 250mg to 5,000mg, which accommodates a wide range of THC preferences, as well as 15 and 30 milliliter containers. The tincture has a price-point that is slightly below average, making it a good option for value seekers. The tincture, which is non-flavored, routinely undergoes third-party testing to ensure safety and high quality; the testing results are available on CBDistillery’s product pages.

Because of this classification, it's not easy for researchers to get their hands on the drug. "That's not to say you can't do it, but there are hoops you need to jump through that can be a pain, which may deter researchers from going into this space," Bonn-Miller said. "Relatively speaking, it's a small group of people in the U.S. that do research on cannabinoids in humans."

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