Last on our list is CBD Pure’s range of hemp extract tinctures, of which there are currently three available concentrations (100, 300, and 600 mg). One of our favorite things about this particular manufacturer is their overall transparency, which in our opinion is second-to-none in the industry. They publish their 3rd-party lab results on their website for you to check out before you decide on a product, and customers absolutely love this about them:
On multiple occasions I’ve taken orally formatted CBD as a test to determine whether it would lower my anxiety.  The first occasion involved utilizing an extremely low dose which yielded a slightly noticeable psychological relaxation effect.  The second time I administered CBD, I ingested a substantially greater dosage than the first occasion, but was also stressed prior to taking it.
A study published in 2008 indicated that CBD injections into the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray area of rats reduced anxiety via 5-HT1A receptor interaction.  Researchers noted that the 5-HT1A receptors were more involved than cannabinoid receptors (e.g. CB1) in reducing anxiety.  The study concluded that cannabidiol interacts directly with 5-HT1A receptors to yield an anxiolytic response.

Indeed, hemp oil products have grown out of a market largely devoid of regulations or safety protocols. The state of the CBD industry harks back to the age of elixirs and potions hawked from covered wagons to the awed denizens of pioneer towns. There are no industrywide standards in place to ensure that CBD oils are consistently formulated batch-to-batch. There is no regulatory body screening products for pesticides, heavy metals, solvent residues, and other dangerous contaminants. The laboratories that companies contract to test their CBD products are themselves neither standardized nor consistently regulated. No medical research exists to recommend how much CBD a patient should take, nor is there detailed, reliable documentation of how CBD interacts with most epilepsy medications.

Critics contend that the Realm of Caring parents are using their kids as guinea pigs, that not enough studies have been done, that many, if not most, of the claims can be dismissed as the result of the placebo effect. “It’s true, we don’t know the long-term effects of CBD, and we should study it,” Meagan says. “But I can tell you this. Without it, our Addy would be a sack of potatoes.” No one asks, she notes, about the long-term effects of a widely used pharmaceutical that has been routinely prescribed for her two-year-old. “Our insurance pays for it, no questions asked,” she says. “But it’s highly addictive, highly toxic, turns you into a zombie, and can actually kill you. And yet it’s perfectly legal.”

These CBD-only laws also attempt to impose some regulation on CBD oils, such as establishing how much CBD and THC such products must contain. For example, on June 1, the day I sat down with Hernandez in Fort Worth, Texas, Governor Greg Abbott signed the state’s Compassionate Use Act into law in Austin. The law requires that all CBD products contain no more than 0.5 percent THC and at least 10 percent CBD. However, the bill does not specify how the state plans to enforce this requirement. The law contains no language outlining how laboratories can test CBD products, what kinds of standards they would use, or who would regulate them.

After seasonal harvests of specific cultivars, these high-CBD hemp crops are put through a specialized solvent-free extraction process to yield a hemp oil that is naturally high in cannabidiol. This pure hemp extract is then tested for safety, quality, and cannabinoid content before being exported to our processing facilities in the United States. Importing any cannabis or hemp product into the United States is a complicated and serious task, so we leave nothing to chance before our high-CBD hemp oil makes its journey across the Atlantic Ocean.


Several complexities of the eCB system may impact upon the potential of CBD and other CB1R-activating agents to serve as anxiolytic drugs. First, CB1R agonists, including THC and AEA, have a biphasic effect: low doses are anxiolytic, but higher doses are ineffective or anxiogenic, in both preclinical models in and humans (reviewed in [33, 45]). This biphasic profile may stem from the capacity of CB1R agonists to also activate TRPV1 receptors when administered at a high, but not low dose, as demonstrated for AEA [46]. Activation of TRPV1 receptors is predominantly anxiogenic, and thus a critical balance of eCB levels, determining CB1 versus TRPV1 activation, is proposed to govern emotional behavior [27, 47]. CBD acts as a TRPV1 agonist at high concentrations, potentially by interfering with AEA inactivation [48]. In addition to dose-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels, the anxiogenic versus anxiolytic balance of CB1R agonists also depends on dynamic factors, including environmental stressors [33, 49].


From our personal experience, we can also confirm that CBD can have a very calming effect. We can as well imagine that it can help with anxiety, although we do not suffer from anxiety. When I was stressed out by pressure, it always helped a lot. This may not exactly be anxiety in the real sense of it, but the potential could already be guessed well.
Anxiolytic effects in models used: CER = reduced fear response; CFC = reduced conditioned freezing; CFC extinction = reduced freezing following extinction training; EPM = reduced % time in open arm; ETM = decreased inhibitory avoidance; L-DT = increased % time in light; VCT = increased licks indicating reduced conflict; NSF = reduced latency to feed; OF = increased % time in center; SI = increased social interaction
Worsening of anxiety: Though most research indicates that cannabidiol is likely to decrease anxiety in humans and animal models, contrasting evidence necessitates consideration. A study published in 2012 by ElBatsh et al. examined the effects of CBD administration on rodent behavior and protein expression.  Notably, CBD decreased frontal and hippocampal BDNF and reduced TrkB and phosphor-ERK1/2 expression.  This suggests that when used frequently, CBD may exacerbate underlying anxiety. (Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22083592).

Sleep enhancement: Many individuals with anxiety disorders struggle to get proper sleep. Anxiety often causes insomnia and insomnia often causes anxiety – leading to a vicious cycle of back-and-forth reinforcement that is seemingly inescapable.  Administration of CBD has been shown to restore normal REM sleep and is thought to improve sleep quality of certain individuals.
It’s also one of the strongest and most concentrated CBD products on the market today. With a grain-of-rice-sized recommended serving taken orally twice a day, its potent punch acts quickly—in just ten to fifteen minutes—to provide powerful relief. Furthermore, it offers terrific value for your money, boasting more CBD per dollar than many other CBD products.
As it turns out, healthy sleep-wake cycles are extremely dependent on our state of “alertness” during the day. If you are a victim of insomnia, for example, you (along with millions of other individuals) are likely drowsy, fatigued, and generally “out-of-sorts” during the afternoon. As you might imagine, this wreaks havoc on your sleep-wake cycle as it makes it nearly impossible to enter and maintain the non-REM sleep that you need at night.
Although the science is still unclear on the subject, cannabis oil is being considered as a natural cancer treatment as well as cancer preventer option because it may decrease the size of tumors and alleviate nausea, pain, lack of appetite and weakness. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved alternative cannabis oil cancer treatment or use of cannabis oil for any other medical condition, but research shows that it has some anti-cancer properties.

Following cloning of the endogenous receptor for THC, namely the CB1R, endogenous CB1R ligands, or “endocannabinoids” (eCBs) were discovered, namely anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (reviewed in [22]). The CB1R is an inhibitory Gi/o protein-coupled receptor that is mainly localized to nerve terminals, and is expressed on both γ-aminobutryic acid-ergic and glutamatergic neurons. eCBs are fatty acid derivatives that are synthesized on demand in response to neuronal depolarization and Ca2+ influx, via cleavage of membrane phospholipids. The primary mechanism by which eCBs regulate synaptic function is retrograde signaling, wherein eCBs produced by depolarization of the postsynaptic neuron activate presynaptic CB1Rs, leading to inhibition of neurotransmitter release [23]. The “eCB system” includes AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; their respective degradative enzymes fatty acid amide hydroxylase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase; the CB1R and related CB2 receptor (the latter expressed mainly in the periphery); as well as several other receptors activated by eCBs, including the TRPV1 receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and G protein-coupled 55 receptor, which functionally interact with CB1R signaling (reviewed in [21, 24]). Interactions with the TRPV1 receptor, in particular, appear to be critical in regulating the extent to which eCB release leads to inhibition or facilitation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release [25]. The TRPV1 receptor is a postsynaptic cation channel that underlies sensation of noxious heat in the periphery, with capsacin (hot chili) as an exogenous ligand. TRPV1 receptors are also expressed in the brain, including the amygdala, periaqueductal grey, hippocampus, and other areas [26, 27].
Although not as abundant as THC cannabinoid content, cannabidiol accounts for approximately 40% of all cannabinoids within cannabis extract.  Unlike THC, cannabidiol is non-psychoactive and isn’t typically ingested with the intent to attain any sort of psychological euphoria.  That said, the medicinal properties associated with cannabidiol (often administered in the format of “CBD oil”) are thought to far exceed those of THC.
Bonn-Miller also explained that it's imperative to exhaust the traditional and established front-line treatments that are available before seeking out these products. "CBD is not really a first-line treatment for anything," he said. "You don’t want situations where somebody says, 'I have cancer I'm going to forgo chemotherapy because I read something about CBD or THC helping with cancer.'" That's not a good idea, Bonn-Miller said. "Not only is the science not there, but you may end up worse off."

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Medical Disclaimer: Statements in any video or written content on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medications, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using this product. Representations regarding the efficacy and safety of CBD oil have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA only evaluates foods and drugs, not supplements like these products. These products are not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure any disease. The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any supplement program.

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