Hey Linda. Sorry to hear you are struggling with sleep. I know how frustrating this can be. As I’m not a medical professional, I cannot give you advice on dosage for CBD. The Mayo Clinic used to have a dosage guidelines page but they have since taken it down. The dosage they had listed which could potentially help with sleep was 40 mg to 160 mg of CBD. I recommend you let your prescribing physician know you are using CBD alongside the Lunesta.
I have idiopathic peripheral neuropathy ... the only thing they found that would work is lyrica. I picked up some CBD oil yesterday morning. I am prescribed to take 75 mg of lyrica 3x per day. I took one yesterday morning and have only used the CBD oil since. I bought the Koi brand, flavored, 250 MG. I used a full dropper yesterday late morning and a full dropper yesterday late afternoon. I used it once today (one full dropper) and I am amazingly pain free.

Research conducted by Schier et al. (2012) aimed to review the literature of cannabidiol (CBD) as an anxiolytic due to the fact that it is non-psychotomimetic.  Researchers gathered scientific publications from English, Portuguese, and Spanish databases.  All compiled articles analyzed the anxiolytic effects of cannabidiol from both human and animal model studies.

So far, though, there’s scant clinical evidence for the claimed benefits of CBD. In June, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first CBD drug, Epidiolex, for treating seizures associated with two rare forms of epilepsy. Otherwise, the FDA doesn’t consider CBD products to be dietary supplements—manufacturers can’t claim the products will diagnose, treat, or cure any diseases. Instead, CBD product literature contains phrases like “restore vitality,” “relax and recover,” and “may keep healthy people healthy.”
Research works have been pretty favorable in describing the role of CBD in improvisation of REM sleep phase. For example, in a study, it has been found that CBD is effective in regulating REM sleep alteration that is induced by anxiety in rats. It is important to mention here that anxiety is an important risk factor of insomnia. Moreover, CBD is also employed for fighting off with anxiety.

Side effects of CBD include sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, weakness, sleeping problems, and others.[3] It does not have intoxicating effects like those caused by THC, and may have an opposing effect on disordered thinking and anxiety produced by THC.[7][12][13] CBD has been found to interact with a variety of different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors.[7][14] The mechanism of action of CBD in terms of its psychoactive and therapeutic effects is not fully clear.[7]


Hi, Congrats on finishing chemo & radiation that’s awesome!! I wish you the best of luck!! I was actually wanting to know about dosage for cancer as well..My parents both have recently been diagnosed with cancer 4 months apart and are currently going thru chemo together. I have tried looking for the dosage info but can never find what i’m looking for..I want to try to help lesson the chemo side effects and hopefully kill some of the cancer cells. Can someone please help us?Thank You Christy
Although the 5-HT1A partial agonism exerted by CBD may not be an outright cure for anxiety, it is likely to help many individuals.  Studies conducted on humans with panic disorder note impairments in 5-HT1A receptor function and poor 5-HT1A binding.  The bottom line is that individuals with anxiety could have dysfunctional 5-HT1A activation and may resort to commercialized 5-HT1A partial agonists (e.g. Buspar) as treatments.
Cannabidiol’s anti-anxiety (Zuardi et al., 1993, 2017; Crippa et al., 2009; Bergamaschi et al., 2011b) and antidepressant (Saito et al., 2010; Zanelati et al., 2010) potential seems to differ from other drugs with effects on the central nervous system, since we found no alterations in sleep architecture. Additionally, studies on the anxiolytic, antipsychotic and antiparkinson effects of CBD described no sedation or drowsiness side effects in their volunteers (Zuardi et al., 1993; Crippa et al., 2004; Fusar-Poli et al., 2009; Chagas et al., 2014a). These findings complement the literature on the few significant side effects resulting from the administration of CBD to humans in a wide range of doses, administered chronically or acutely (Bergamaschi et al., 2011b; Kerstin and Grotenhermen, 2017). It seems, therefore, that CBD has an adequate safety profile with good tolerability and does not affect psychomotricity or cognition (Hayakawa et al., 2007; Crippa et al., 2010; Bergamaschi et al., 2011b; Kerstin and Grotenhermen, 2017). This is particularly important in Parkinson’s disease, where motor and cognitive symptoms play a central role.
CBD can be taken in a few ways. Oil is probably the most popular, but it can also be taken in capsule form, or even as a chocolate or gummy. After a week of taking CBD in oil form every night, it was clear I’d stumbled across something kind of remarkable. I often slept well the first few nights of trying something new before it stopped working its magic, which I partially attribute to the placebo effect. With CBD, however, the good nights of sleep kept on coming.
My MD has prescribed at least 20 different BP drugs for me, but I do not feel that any really worked; and some were so dangerous that I refused to used them more than one or 2 nights, and then would disgard them, especially after reading about the possible side effects. Never tried CBD oil, but my guru nutritionist has given me a bottle of 1200mg organic hemp oil from Veggimins and I have been hesitant to really try it.
Their CBD oil is high-quality due to their unique CO2 extraction process which contains no pesticides, solvents, herbicides or chemical fertilizers. Furthermore, they have all their products tested by third-party laboratories. According to customers, their star product has been great for sleep disorders, anxiety, pain relief and for taking on stress, although it’s important to note that not everyone may experience the same results.
Research works in this aspect are inclining in the favor of CBD for alleviation of insomnia. For example, a study carried out in the year 2006 revealed that cannabidiol (CBD), which is the second important constituent of cannabis, and is non-psychoactive in nature, may have an impact on the sleep mechanism of rats. It was shown to increase alertness with light, and had no particular impact on sleep with the lights off. This provides an insight that CBD could be brought into use for therapeutic relief of day-time somnolence, and hence, can this way improve night-time sleep.
The cannabinoids found in both CBD and THC oil mimic the endocannabinoids that our bodies naturally produce. Endocannabinoids are compounds that regulate vital functions such as internal stability, homeostasis, pain regulation, and immune system functioning. Whether they’re produced by the body or obtained from the cannabis plant, cannabinoids facilitate communication on a cellular level between cells to trigger various bodily processes. Therefore, a deficiency of cannabinoids can result in a system thrown out of balance, manifesting in unwanted symptoms and other health complications.
Researchers Bergamaschi et al. (2011) highlighted previous literature regarding CBDs anxiolytic properties and lack of psychotomimetic effects.  For this reason, they wanted to test its efficacy for the treatment of anxiety among 24 individuals with social phobia.  It should be noted that all 24 of these individuals had never received any sort of prior treatment (e.g. SSRIs) as an intervention for their social anxiety and were considered “treatment-naïve.”
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CBD interacts with the body through the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS) or endocannabinoid system. First discovered in the late 1980’s, the endocannabinoid system regulates the body’s homeostasis, or general state of balance, impacting such functions as mood, sleep, appetite, hormone regulation, and pain and immune response. Like an acrobat on a highwire, as the environment around us impacts our normal balance, the endocannabinoid system “corrects” by mediating our body’s reaction to keep us level.

If I had to rate the efficacy of the second dosing option for anxiety on a scale of 1 to 10, I’d rate it about a 6.  Meaning, it was noticeably more effective than the first low-dose at even just 20 mg.  Perhaps in the future I’ll press my luck with an even greater dose of around 60 mg, which is equivalent to 600 mg CBD and the dosage that has been documented as effective for anxiety in clinical research.
The eCB system regulates diverse physiological functions, including caloric energy balance and immune function [28]. The eCB system is also integral to regulation of emotional behavior, being essential to forms of synaptic plasticity that determine learning and response to emotionally salient, particularly highly aversive events [29, 30]. Activation of CB1Rs produces anxiolytic effects in various models of unconditioned fear, relevant to multiple anxiety disorder symptom domains (reviewed in [30–33]). Regarding conditioned fear, the effect of CB1R activation is complex: CB1R activation may enhance or reduce fear expression, depending on brain locus and the eCB ligand [34]; however, CB1R activation potently enhances fear extinction [35], and can prevent fear reconsolidation. Genetic manipulations that impede CB1R activation are anxiogenic [35], and individuals with eCB system gene polymorphisms that reduce eCB tone—for example, FAAH gene polymorphisms—exhibit physiological, psychological, and neuroimaging features consistent with impaired fear regulation [36]. Reduction of AEA–CB1R signaling in the amygdala mediates the anxiogenic effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone [37], and CB1R activation is essential to negative feedback of the neuroendocrine stress response, and protects against the adverse effects of chronic stress [38, 39]. Finally, chronic stress impairs eCB signaling in the hippocampus and amygdala, leading to anxiety [40, 41], and people with PTSD show elevated CB1R availability and reduced peripheral AEA, suggestive of reduced eCB tone [42].
In general, the preparation methods for unregulated cannabis oil are relatively simple. They do not entail highly specialised equipment, and use easily accessible solvents such as petroleum ether, naphtha, alcohol and olive oil. For this reason, people who have access to cannabis plant material, from either legal or illegal sources, may prepare it at home by themselves.

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