Despite these limitations, this is the first controlled study to evaluate the effects of CBD on sleep architecture using polysomnography. Although the absence of interference with the sleep cycle is not sufficient for concluding that sleep is not affected, the results obtained contribute for the understanding of the effects of CBD in the modulation of sleep in humans.
One thing that I really really liked though, was that the effects seemed to last a long time. I have only taken the oil on four separate occasions now, and each time it’s seemed to last like 6-8 hours (or at least all evening). This makes sense too, because after doing a little reading up I found that the sublingual tinctures are much longer-lasting than CBD vape oils or e-juices.
According to a growing body of research, CBD may play a role in the growth of new brain cells, a process known as neurogenesis. CBD is also widely recognized as having anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory abilities, which make CBD a promising therapy for a wide range of conditions, from neurological disorders to autoimmune diseases to chronic pain and depression.
This is a topic I am asked about all the time, and have been for years: how does cannabis help sleep and health? I’ve heard that the number-two reason why people smoke or use cannabis is for sleep. Considering the recent passing of the recreational use of cannabis in California and other several states I think it is high time (pun intended!) to look at CBD, one of the most active ingredients in medical cannabis.
GPR55 antagonism: GPR55 (G-protein-coupled receptor 55) is a receptor expressed predominantly within the caudate nucleus and putamen.  It is often referenced as an atypical cannabinoid receptor due to the fact that it is activated by cannabinoids.  A study published in 2015 investigated the role of GPR55 function in anxiety.  Researchers concluded that GPR55 may modulate anxiety-related behaviors in rats.  In the study, it was discovered that GPR55 antagonists lead to increased anxiety.  Cannabidiol is thought to act as a GPR55 antagonist which may improve bone health and decrease proliferation of cancer cells – but may not help anxiety.
Certain individuals may be more prone to anxiety than others as a result of mu-opioid receptor expression and/or activation.  Research indicates that mu-opioid receptors participate in the modulation of anxiety based on the specific region of the brain in which they are stimulated.  What’s more, a report published in 2015 indicated that the neural circuitry associated with the DOR (delta opioid receptor) can induce OR inhibit anxiety.

Out of the 17 states that have passed CBD-only laws, five— Missouri, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas—would also establish licensed cultivation centers to grow high-CBD strains of cannabis, which could be turned into oils and other CBD products. This would cut down on the demand for CBD oil from unregulated manufacturers abroad. Even then, though, impediments remain. In Missouri, for example, two neurologists recently refused to prescribe CBD oil for an eight- year-old boy suffering from seizures, citing concerns over federal law and the safety of non-FDA approved products.
Hash oil is an extracted cannabis product that may utilize any part of the plant. Ideally, the final product will not contain any residual traces of solvents. It is generally thought to be indistinct from traditional hashish according to the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (Schedule I and IV) as it is "the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from the cannabis plant".

I am currently going through red skin syndrome/topical steroid withdrawal. The only cure as of now is time(6 months to 3 years) and waiting out horrible eczema-like flares. My main issue is burning/tingling skin that is almost constant. Steroids close off blood vessels and when you stop them they 'wake' up causing this nerve discomfort/pain. I've been smoking medical cannabis for the duration of my recovery(1.5 years) and It's done wonders except that the flare is around my mouth and I'm afraid the smoking is causing more issues.. as well as helping. I need to step up my game and take a different approach. I am wondering how to go about using cbd but I don't know where to start and was wondering if you could help. Thank you


When Meagan’s in-laws suggested they look into medical marijuana, she recoiled. “This is a federally illegal drug we are talking about,” she recalls thinking. But she did her own research. A good deal of anecdotal evidence shows that high-CBD strains of cannabis can have a strong antiseizure effect. The medical literature, though scant, goes back surprisingly far. In 1843 a British doctor named William O’Shaughnessy published an article detailing how cannabis oil had arrested an infant’s relentless convulsions.


When exposed to air, warmth and light (especially without antioxidants), the oil loses its taste and psychoactivity due to aging. Cannabinoid carboxylic acids (THCA, CBDA, and maybe others) have an antibiotic effect on gram-positive bacteria such as (penicillin-resistant) Staphylococcus aureus, but gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are unaffected.[26]
Although the 5-HT1A receptor partial agonism is thought to facilitate a majority of CBD’s anxiolytic effects – hippocampal neurogenesis, opioidergic modulation, and CB1/CB2 inverse agonism likely also contribute.  Lesser researched mechanisms of CBD that could also decrease anxiety include: FAAH inhibition, adenosine reuptake inhibition, GPR55 antagoism, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) increases, and PPAR agonism.  Of these mechanisms, inhibition of FAAH may be most significant in regards to anxiety attenuation.
Designs: To accurately know whether CBD is an effective intervention for anxiety disorders, robust designs should be implemented in research. In other words, study designs should be placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized, and preferably with large sample sizes.  Unfortunately, a majority of the published literature investigating the anxiolytic potential of CBD utilizes suboptimal designs, has limited numbers of participants, or both.
Side effects of CBD include sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, weakness, sleeping problems, and others.[3] It does not have intoxicating effects like those caused by THC, and may have an opposing effect on disordered thinking and anxiety produced by THC.[7][12][13] CBD has been found to interact with a variety of different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors.[7][14] The mechanism of action of CBD in terms of its psychoactive and therapeutic effects is not fully clear.[7]
Adenosine 2A receptor: Administration of CBD is thought to act upon the adenosine 2A receptor site, possibly contributing to its anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory effects.  Adenosine receptors are known to influence cardiovascular processes (cardiac rhythm, circulation), immune function, sleep, pain regulation, and blood flow.  The adenosine 2A receptor interacts with G proteins to alter cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate).  Dysfunction of the adenosine 2A receptor may disrupt neurotransmission of glutamate and dopamine, and simultaneously cause inflammation, neurodegeneration, and possibly anxiety.

You may be familiar with a concept called the entourage effect. The entourage effect states that cannabinoids work better together than they do alone. In essence, CBD is more effective when combined with other cannabinoids like CBG, CBN, THC, and so on than it is in isolation. The terms “full-spectrum” and “whole-plant” are alluding to this concept. Biologically, a person gets high by having THC bind to CB1 receptors in the brain. CBD also binds to CB1 receptors in the brain and has been shown to actually counteract some of the effects of getting high by blocking the activation of THC in CB1 receptors. CBD changes the shape of the receptor so that there is less room for THC to bind to. CBD has even been shown to decrease the heightened heart rate that you feel from getting high. Therefore CBD can even have an impact on the anxiety that comes from the psychoactive effects of THC.


I should preface this segment by documenting the specific type of CBD that I ingested.  I purchased the supplement BioCBD+, a product that received solid customer feedback online and appears to have high-quality manufacturing standards.  What’s more is that the product incorporates Hybrid-NanoEngineering technology which is thought to increase the bioavailability of orally administered CBD by 10-fold.
It is known that a major problem of several medications used in the treatment of clinical anxiety and depression is their effect on sleep architecture. Benzodiazepines are an example, since despite the rapid onset of their anxiolytic action, these drugs may produce undesirable side effects such as the increase in non-REM stage 2 sleep and reduction of SWS (Borbély et al., 1985). Long-term use of benzodiazepines may also cause reduction of SWS, loss of efficacy in the treatment of insomnia, alterations in electroencephalogram results during sleep (Poyares et al., 2004) and cognitive dysfunction, even after drug discontinuation (Stewart, 2005).
It's also safe to take up to 1,500 milligrams of CBD, according to a study published in Neurotherapeutics, which means there's not much risk—and maybe a fair amount to gain—in dosing yourself before bed. So over the course of two weeks, I experimented with four different kinds of CBD to see how it would affect my sleep. I took each one at the same time each night and each type for three nights. Here's what went down:

As of now, researchers understand that sleep is divided into multiple cycles with different phases, and it is generally regarded that CBD oil increases sleep in the third phase, which is the “deep sleep” phase. Furthermore, it has been shown that CBD decreases the duration of REM sleep, which is a phase of light sleep and is also the phase where dreams occur.
Liquid CBD Oil/Tinctures/Extracts: Drops or tinctures should have a “suggested serving size” and the total milligrams of CBD listed on their packaging. From there, you can determine the amount of CBD you would like to ingest. Simply place the correct quantity of drops under your tongue using the dropper and hold the CBD oil in place for a minimum of 60 seconds. The 60 second hold allows for absorption via the blood vessels underneath your tongue – efficiently bypassing first-pass metabolism. Once 60 seconds has passed, swallow the CBD oil.

Hey Dave. I just noticed that as well. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. Most of the information I’ve read on using CBD for sleep generally says that “higher” doses work best for sleep and insomnia. The Mayo Clinic’s site use to say to try a dose from 40 – 160 mg of CBD. This range is indeed higher than a typical serving size of CBD, which is more in the range of 10 – 20 mg. Let me know if you have any questions please.
You may be familiar with a concept called the entourage effect. The entourage effect states that cannabinoids work better together than they do alone. In essence, CBD is more effective when combined with other cannabinoids like CBG, CBN, THC, and so on than it is in isolation. The terms “full-spectrum” and “whole-plant” are alluding to this concept. Biologically, a person gets high by having THC bind to CB1 receptors in the brain. CBD also binds to CB1 receptors in the brain and has been shown to actually counteract some of the effects of getting high by blocking the activation of THC in CB1 receptors. CBD changes the shape of the receptor so that there is less room for THC to bind to. CBD has even been shown to decrease the heightened heart rate that you feel from getting high. Therefore CBD can even have an impact on the anxiety that comes from the psychoactive effects of THC.
CBD has a broad pharmacological profile, including interactions with several receptors known to regulate fear and anxiety-related behaviors, specifically the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, and the transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor [11, 12, 19, 21]. In addition, CBD may also regulate, directly or indirectly, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 55, the equilibrative nucleoside transporter, the adenosine transporter, additional TRP channels, and glycine receptors [11, 12, 19, 21]. In the current review of primary studies, the following receptor-specific actions were found to have been investigated as potential mediators of CBD’s anxiolytic action: CB1R, TRPV1 receptors, and 5-HT1A receptors. Pharmacology relevant to these actions is detailed below.
CBD concentrates typically contain the strongest dosage of CBD compared to any other CBD products. It can contain up to 10 times the average CBD products. Concentrates are also convenient in that it only takes a few seconds to consume. Overall, CBD concentrates seem to be most popular among customers who are extremely busy, yet seek high potency CBD.
The studies done on CBD oil have a pretty wide dose range (anywhere from a few milligrams to hundreds of milligrams). I suggest starting at the lower end (around 10 milligrams) and slowly increasing over a few weeks or months to see what works for you. Some people also do well with splitting the dosage throughout the day instead of taking the dose all at once. As with everything, it is always a good idea to talk with your prescribing doctor if you are on any medications. CBD is generally very safe, but there are some pharmaceutical medications CBD oil could potentially interact with and increase or decrease the pharmaceutical drugs' effectiveness.

Looking back on it now, I can’t believe it’s never really occurred to me to try cannabis as a natural therapy – I have used marijuana kind of off and on a few times over the years, but never specifically to treat anxiety or any other condition. At most, I was what you might call a “social” pot user (and in fact, on several different occasions the weed that I smoked seemed to actually promote my anxiety and panic attacks – which I later learned was common with high THC strains).
My trouble falling asleep has never been a major problem. But when I recently learned that nearly 60 percent of people taking cannabidiol—better known as CBD, one of the over 80 compounds found in the marijuana plant—are doing it to help with sleep, I was intrigued. (That stat's according to a survey conducted by Brightfield Group and HelloMD, an online community that brings doctors and cannabis patients together.)
A study published by Blessing et al. (2015) evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of cannabidiol in the treatment of anxiety disorders.  Researchers compiled and assessed evidence from preclinical, experimental, clinical, and epidemiological publications.  This report concluded that preclinical evidence supports the usage of CBD as a potential intervention for anxiety disorders.

From this study we can conclude that the acute effects of THC (e.g. increased anxiety) are unfavorable.  Evidence suggests that CBD appears well-tolerated and safe, with no adverse physiological reactions compared to a placebo.  However, since the physiological effects of CBD (600 mg) were of no statistically significant difference from the placebo, it is unclear if CBD elicits any therapeutic effect – even at a seemingly reasonable dose.


I’m the same about taking any medication in case it makes me feel dizzy or light headed, which would then lead to massive anxiety. I am excited at my first bottle of CBD oil arriving in the post but I know I will put off taking it until I feel brave enough. I have been advised to just have one drop at a time and not the 15 that I see others take per dose. I would also like to take it daily as I do my vitamin B tablets. Thoughts anyone please?
Pharmaceutical companies producing oils are subject to a pharmaceutical production licence for controlled drugs, issued by government regulators. Currently there are no pharmaceutical companies producing cannabis oil as a medicine. This might change in the future when a standardised, GMP-certified production method becomes available, setting the standards for the production of cannabis oil as a pharmaceutical product.

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Medical Disclaimer: Statements in any video or written content on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medications, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using this product. Representations regarding the efficacy and safety of CBD oil have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA only evaluates foods and drugs, not supplements like these products. These products are not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure any disease. The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any supplement program.

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