Preclinical evidence conclusively demonstrates CBD’s efficacy in reducing anxiety behaviors relevant to multiple disorders, including PTSD, GAD, PD, OCD, and SAD, with a notable lack of anxiogenic effects. CBD’s anxiolytic actions appear to depend upon CB1Rs and 5-HT1ARs in several brain regions; however, investigation of additional receptor actions may reveal further mechanisms. Human experimental findings support preclinical findings, and also suggest a lack of anxiogenic effects, minimal sedative effects, and an excellent safety profile. Current preclinical and human findings mostly involve acute CBD dosing in healthy subjects, so further studies are required to establish whether chronic dosing of CBD has similar effects in relevant clinical populations. Overall, this review emphasizes the potential value and need for further study of CBD in the treatment of anxiety disorders.
Once I'm asleep, I sleep like I'm dead—I can't be roused by vacuuming, hurricanes, or all three of my morning workout alarms. It's getting to sleep that's the problem. Talk to me all you want about too much blue light and screen time, but even on the nights when I read from a real book, I'm still tossing and turning for at least an hour before I eventually fade out.
@gailb I am in SC where it can only be prescribed for last days of cancer pain because they don't care if they get "addicted". I will not get on my soapbox, but I would much prefer being addicted to marijuana as there have never been any scientific studies that prove a physical addiction to marijuana as opposed to opiates. Maybe a psychological dependence, but two very different animals. However, I do believe the CBD oil that does not contain THC is legal federally and in all states.
After months of visiting doctors and sitting through tests like a human lab rat, it was determined that there was a slight anomaly in the anatomy of my temporal lobe—the part of the brain that controls hearing, speech, and auditory comprehension—which explains why every time I have a seizure, I suddenly don’t understand the English language. Epilepsy can’t be cured, so the only course of action available for me was to take a medication every day for the rest of my life. My neurologist prescribed a few different anti-convulsant medications, but they all made me feel tired, depressed, slow, and unlike myself—until finally, I found one that was slightly better than the rest.
This is a topic I am asked about all the time, and have been for years: how does cannabis help sleep and health? I’ve heard that the number-two reason why people smoke or use cannabis is for sleep. Considering the recent passing of the recreational use of cannabis in California and other several states I think it is high time (pun intended!) to look at understanding CBD, one of the most active ingredients in medical cannabis.

In 1992 Mechoulam’s quest for quantification led him from the plant itself to the inner recesses of the human brain. That year he and several colleagues made an extraordinary discovery. They isolated the chemical made by the human body that binds to the same receptor in the brain that THC does. Mechoulam named it anandamide—from the Sanskrit for “supreme joy.” (When asked why he didn’t give it a Hebrew name, he replies, “Because in Hebrew there are not so many words for happiness. Jews don’t like being happy.”)


This figure, if accurate, is indeed a substantial number, especially when you take into account the different factors that may be behind this inability to get a decent sleep. If this number is reflective of a population that struggles with getting adequate amounts of sleep, it might suggest a strong need for a remedy that doesn’t mean over-prescribing pharmaceutical sedatives.
Vaney C., Heinzel-Gutenbrunner M., Jobin P., Tschopp F., Gattlen B., Hagen U., et al. (2004). Efficacy, safety and tolerability of an orally administered cannabis extract in the treatment of spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Mult. Scler. 10 417–424. 10.1191/1352458504ms1048oa [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
When exposed to air, warmth and light (especially without antioxidants), the oil loses its taste and psychoactivity due to aging. Cannabinoid carboxylic acids (THCA, CBDA, and maybe others) have an antibiotic effect on gram-positive bacteria such as (penicillin-resistant) Staphylococcus aureus, but gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are unaffected.[26]
@gailb I am in SC where it can only be prescribed for last days of cancer pain because they don't care if they get "addicted". I will not get on my soapbox, but I would much prefer being addicted to marijuana as there have never been any scientific studies that prove a physical addiction to marijuana as opposed to opiates. Maybe a psychological dependence, but two very different animals. However, I do believe the CBD oil that does not contain THC is legal federally and in all states.

After this devastating news, the family researched cannabinoids and found that they have been shown to inhibit the growth of tumor cells in culture and in animal models by modulating key cell-signaling pathways. Her family read that cannabinoids are usually well-tolerated and do not produce the generalized toxic effects of conventional chemotherapies. The family found promise in an organization that treated several cancers with cannabis oil.
Depending on which hormone is stimulated, cannabis can boost or suppress appetite. For this reason, cannabis oil can help patients with eating disorders or be a natural way to treat obesity. This manipulation of the cannabinoid system is becoming popular, and more research is being done to determine its efficacy for patients with weight concerns. (6)
That’s precisely why I was intrigued when I started hearing about CBD, or cannabidiol, a nonpsychoactive compound found in the cannabis or hemp plant that apparently helps with sleep and anxiety. I didn’t exactly get my hopes up ― after all, tons of natural remedies that worked for other people hadn’t worked for me ― but I figured it was worth a shot.
Vaney C., Heinzel-Gutenbrunner M., Jobin P., Tschopp F., Gattlen B., Hagen U., et al. (2004). Efficacy, safety and tolerability of an orally administered cannabis extract in the treatment of spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Mult. Scler. 10 417–424. 10.1191/1352458504ms1048oa [PubMed] [Cross Ref]

Clinical and demographic data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and expressed in terms of mean ± standard error of the mean. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to check for normality. Non-parametric Wilcoxon or Friedman tests analyzed results that failed this test. The remained data was analyzed by two-way repeated-measures ANOVA. A preliminary analysis indicated no gender effect; thus, the factors analyzed were drug, order of drug administration (placebo-CBD versus CBD-placebo), and the interaction between drug and phase. A three-way repeated-measures ANOVA was employed to analyze data throughout the three phases of each exam. In case of significant interactions, paired Student’s t-tests were performed at each phase and/or order to compare the differences between groups. In case of significant time effect, the Bonferroni’s post hoc test was used for multiple comparisons. In cases where sphericity conditions were not reached, the degrees of freedom of the repeated factor were corrected with the Huynh-Feldt epsilon. All the analyses were performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) v.20.0.
In a study whose findings have not yet been published, he and a colleague, Daniel Friedman, found that patients receiving CBD in addition to their usual medicines had 39 percent fewer convulsive seizures than patients who remained on their normal drug regimen. Given that the study included only the most treatment-resistant patients, this is an “excellent response,” Devinsky says.
As noted, CBD has been found to have a bell-shaped response curve, with higher doses being ineffective. This may reflect activation of TRPV1 receptors at higher dose, as blockade of TRPV1 receptors in the DPAG rendered a previously ineffective high dose of CBD as anxiolytic in the EPM [66]. Given TRPV1 receptors have anxiogenic effects, this may indicate that at higher doses, CBD’s interaction with TRPV1 receptors to some extent impedes anxiolytic actions, although was notably not sufficient to produce anxiogenic effects.
One of the most common reasons given by people who use cannabis daily is that they want to improve their sleep. Though, the study findings show occasional use doesn’t disrupt sleep, heavy use or daily use can be associated with sleep difficulties. The effect of daily use on sleep patterns seems to mimic that of alcohol use, in the sense that daily use worsens sleep while intermittent use improves sleep continuity. Neurologist and somnologist, Dr Hans Hamburger explains,

We are staunch advocates of CBD and its many, amazing, scientifically-backed uses. We are also staunch advocates of our patrons and their access to the highest quality, 100% organic CBD products around. Getting the information you need, the exact product you want, and a no hassle transaction with no attached shipping charges – that’s what we are all about.

McGuire doesn’t advise buying CBD products. You need to differentiate, he says, between the extremely high doses of pharmaceutical-grade pure CBD that participants in the handful of successful studies were given and the dietary supplements available over the counter or online. “These may contain quite small amounts of CBD that might not have large enough concentrations to have any effects,” he says. “It’s the difference between a nutraceutical and a pharmaceutical.” These supplements aren’t allowed to make claims of any effects. “If you’re making creams or sports drinks with CBD, you can say anything you like as long as you don’t say it will do such and such,” he says.
Since then several other so-called endocannabinoids and their receptors have been discovered. Scientists have come to recognize that endocannabinoids interact with a specific neurological network—much the way that endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine do. Exercise, Mechoulam notes, has been shown to elevate endocannabinoid levels in the brain, and “this probably accounts for what jogging enthusiasts call runner’s high.” These compounds, he explains, apparently play an important role in such basic functions as memory, balance, movement, immune health, and neuroprotection.
Once I'm asleep, I sleep like I'm dead—I can't be roused by vacuuming, hurricanes, or all three of my morning workout alarms. It's getting to sleep that's the problem. Talk to me all you want about too much blue light and screen time, but even on the nights when I read from a real book, I'm still tossing and turning for at least an hour before I eventually fade out.
My friend had told me that all I do was use the dropper bottle and place 15 drops under my tongue, and then wait for about 90 seconds before swallowing (it also says this very clearly on the bottle as well). I actually went in front of a mirror to administer the drops, so I could count exactly how much I was putting in (you really don’t need to do this though because you can kind of feel the drops as they hit your mouth and count how many you’re putting in that way).

Initial data also suggests that CBD has other far-reaching medical applications. A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology found that “CBD was shown to offer benefits including acting in some experimental models as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antiemetic, anxiolytic and antipsychotic agent.” This means CBD could be used as “potential medicine for the treatment of neuroinflammation, epilepsy, oxidative injury, vomiting and nausea, anxiety and schizophrenia.”
Neuroprotective properties: There’s some evidence to suggest that CBD may act as a neuroprotective agent. In other words, it may prevent brain cell death and/or damage resulting from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.  Those with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy tend to incur damage as a result of inadequate brain oxygenation.  Studies in pigs indicate that CBD protects the brain from hypoxic-ischemic damage.
Results indicated that CBD significantly reduced subjective measures of anxiety as evidenced by changes in VAMS scores.  Neuroimaging data revealed decreased ECD-tracer uptake when participants received the CBD compared to when they took the placebo.  Particularly, activity in the left amygdala-hippocampal complex and the left posterior cingulate gyrus decreased following CBD administration.
McGuire doesn’t advise buying CBD products. You need to differentiate, he says, between the extremely high doses of pharmaceutical-grade pure CBD that participants in the handful of successful studies were given and the dietary supplements available over the counter or online. “These may contain quite small amounts of CBD that might not have large enough concentrations to have any effects,” he says. “It’s the difference between a nutraceutical and a pharmaceutical.” These supplements aren’t allowed to make claims of any effects. “If you’re making creams or sports drinks with CBD, you can say anything you like as long as you don’t say it will do such and such,” he says.
Hash oil or cannabis oil is an oleoresin obtained by the extraction of cannabis or hashish. It is a concentrated form of the plant containing many of its resins and terpenes – in particular, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and other cannabinoids. There are a variety of extraction methods, but most involve a solvent such as butane or ethanol. Hash oil is usually consumed by smoking, vaporizing or eating but sometimes other methods are employed. Hash oil is sometimes sold in cartridges to be used with pen vaporizers.
Side effects of CBD include sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, weakness, sleeping problems, and others.[3] It does not have intoxicating effects like those caused by THC, and may have an opposing effect on disordered thinking and anxiety produced by THC.[7][12][13] CBD has been found to interact with a variety of different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors.[7][14] The mechanism of action of CBD in terms of its psychoactive and therapeutic effects is not fully clear.[7]
Antipsychotic: Those suffering from anxiety as a result of a condition like schizophrenia may benefit from utilization of CBD oil. While the phytocannabinoid THC may exacerbate positive symptoms of schizophrenia (due to its psychotomimetic properties), CBD is understood to have antipsychotic properties.  It isn’t fully elucidated as to how CBD reduces psychotic symptoms, but some believe its indirect modulation of dopaminergic transmission plays a role.
To access CBD oil, a solvent extraction process is required, which returns roughly 3-5 grams of oil per ounce of flower product used. Using grain or isopropyl alcohol as a solvent, you can strain the result of the mixture, leaving CBD oil behind. It is a lengthy process, and in countries where cannabis is legal, there are many places to access high-quality CBD oil.
Neurologists are skilled at predicting side effects and interactions between well-researched pharmaceuticals. But due to the dearth of reliable research about CBD, doctors like Hernandez and Knupp cannot guide their patients in its use. If there are adverse reactions, Penny will find out because Harper will suffer through them. She has had to figure out through trial and error how best to mix and measure Harper’s oils. The bottom line, Penny said, is simple: “We are the research.”
People claim that cannabis oil can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, though evidence to back up these claims is often lacking. For example, according to Medical News Today, people use cannabis oil for conditions ranging from pain to acne; some even claim the oil can cure diseases like Alzheimer's and cancer. (But again, there is no clinical evidence to support these claims.) 

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