Epidemiological studies of various neuropsychiatric disorders indicate that a higher CBD content in chronically consumed cannabis may protect against adverse effects of THC, including psychotic symptoms, drug cravings, memory loss, and hippocampal gray matter loss [115–118] (reviewed in [119]). As THC acutely induces anxiety, this pattern may also be evident for chronic anxiety symptoms. Two studies were identified, including an uncontrolled retrospective study in civilian patients with PTSD patients [120], and a case study in a patient with severe sexual abuse-related PTSD [121], which showed that chronic cannabis use significantly reduces PTSD symptoms; however, these studies did not include data on the THC:CBD ratio. Thus, overall, no outcome data are currently available regarding the chronic effects of CBD in the treatment of anxiety symptoms, nor do any data exist regarding the potential protective effects of CBD on anxiety potentially induced by chronic THC use.

Typical treatments for anxiety usually center around either therapy, medication or both. This includes talk therapy or cognitive behavioral therapy, and medications like benzodiazepines, antidepressants, beta blockers and SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). But non-pharmaceutical solutions are also becoming more popular, especially as new research on them emerges. Case in point: CBD products.
Although delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (known as THC) is the primary psychoactive ingredient, other known compounds with biologic activity are cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabichromene, cannabigerol, tetrahydrocannabivarin and delta-8-THC. Cannabidiol (CBD) is thought to have significant pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory activity without the psychoactive effect of delta-9-THC. (2)
All I can say is that evening, I had a great dinner (pizza!) and sat on the couch watching TV in a state of genuine contentment. I actually remember thinking to myself while watching an episode of The Office, “holy crap, that CBD must’ve really actually worked.” I experienced no side effects whatsoever, and I went to bed that night and had a genuinely good sleep.
One of the earliest researchers of CBD as an intervention for anxiety is Zuardi.  In 1982, Zuardi et al. published a paper examining the effects of cannabidiol on anxiety induced by THC.  They also wanted to elucidate whether the attenuation of THC-induced anxiety by CBD resulted from an inhibition of THC or through a distinct anxiolytic mechanism.
Dr. Robert Carson is a pediatric neurologist at Vanderbilt University who has evaluated the effectiveness of CBD supplements in kids with seizures. He says the supplements can be beneficial for these children. However, he says, if the FDA follows its advisory panel's advice and approves a pharmaceutical-grade CBD drug, that would open up a new treatment option by delivering a high-quality, consistent dose of CBD.
CBD was first discovered in the 1940s by Roger Adams, the former head of the chemistry department at University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. In his research, Adams isolated CBD from hemp but couldn’t determine what exactly he’d found. In addition to CBD, Adams also synthesized analogs of THC and another cannabinoid, showing their relationship to CBD.
CBD has a broad pharmacological profile, including interactions with several receptors known to regulate fear and anxiety-related behaviors, specifically the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, and the transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor [11, 12, 19, 21]. In addition, CBD may also regulate, directly or indirectly, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 55, the equilibrative nucleoside transporter, the adenosine transporter, additional TRP channels, and glycine receptors [11, 12, 19, 21]. In the current review of primary studies, the following receptor-specific actions were found to have been investigated as potential mediators of CBD’s anxiolytic action: CB1R, TRPV1 receptors, and 5-HT1A receptors. Pharmacology relevant to these actions is detailed below.
Because I never go downtown, I had to stop for a latte at my favorite coffee shop—and a second CBD pick-me-up. By the time I stepped into the crowded Indie Beauty Expo, I felt calm and happy. As an introvert, I usually have a hard time making small talk at events. But post-CBD oil, I felt comfortable enough to chat up a storm with every person I met! Three hours later I dragged myself out of the huge exposition and made it to my meditation class, where I took another dropper of CBD oil. Although I really love meditating, I find it particularly challenging to get into the “zone” after a long day at work. Not so much after taking some CBD—it was easy to calm my mind and tune into my breath, despite how fast-paced my day had been.
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Blake Pearson, founder of GreenlyMed and a practicing doctor in Ontario, Canada, specializes in cannabinoid medicine and said he has personally seen patients who have lowered their intake of prescription medications or reduced the negative side effects of taking other medications. However, Pearson would like to see more robust research, including random controlled trials.
However, Bonn-Miller told Live Science that he thinks cannabis research is on the upswing. "If we flash forward five years I think you'll see more studies," he said. Those studies could reveal more conditions that CBD may be helpful for and may also reveal that some of the reasons why people say they use CBD oil are not supported by the science but are instead a placebo effect. "And that's why we need to do the studies," he said.  

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