Mike, what kind of breast cancer (invasive ductal, I presume)? How many of her lymph nodes were positive? How big was the primary tumor? Reason I ask is that in women with Stage I or IIA tumors that are estrogen-and progesterone-receptor-positive and HER2-negative (ER+/PR+/HER2-) with three or fewer positive lymph nodes, there is a genomic assay test on a sample of the tumor, called OncotypeDX, that will tell doctors whether chemo is necessary or would even work at all. Medicare covers that test 100%.That type of breast cancer mentioned above, which I had as Stage IA, is treated in postmenopausal women with anti-estrogen drugs called aromatase inhibitors(aka AIs: anastrazole, letrozole, or exemestane)which have as a side effect joint pain. CBD oil is effective for this joint pain it is not, I repeat, NOT a substitute for chemo, radiation or these anti-estrogen drugs.So don’t assume your mom’s cancer will require chemo; but if it does, CBD helps with those side effects as well. If she lives in a state where medical marijuana is legal, there are doctors who sub-specialize in certifying applications for a medical marijuana card, and in the interim before the card is issued can advise as to the appropriate dose of CBD oil (legal and over-the-counter in all 50 states). Some (though not most) medical oncologists will certify their own patients’ medical marijuana card applications so she need not seek out another doctor; and will advise the appropriate dose for her symptoms. Once she gets her card, the “budtenders” in the licensed dispensaries can advise her as to the right CBD product (with or without THC), strength, and dosage. If she lives in a state where recreational weed is legal, the “budtenders” in the marijuana shops can steer her to the right strength of CBD oil and the right dosage.
“The brain has these receptors that respond to endocannabinoids, which are neurotransmitters that are naturally produced in the body and brain,” says Jerald Simmons, a neurologist at Houston’s Comprehensive Sleep Medicine Associates. “Some of the cannabinoids in the marijuana plant are very similar to the endocannabinoids in the brain, and they act on the same receptors.”
Fear and anxiety are adaptive responses essential to coping with threats to survival. Yet excessive or persistent fear may be maladaptive, leading to disability. Symptoms arising from excessive fear and anxiety occur in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Notably, PTSD and OCD are no longer classified as anxiety disorders in the recent revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5; however, excessive anxiety is central to the symptomatology of both disorders. These anxiety-related disorders are associated with a diminished sense of well-being, elevated rates of unemployment and relationship breakdown, and elevated suicide risk [1–3]. Together, they have a lifetime prevalence in the USA of 29 % [4], the highest of any mental disorder, and constitute an immense social and economic burden [5, 6].
Szaflarski explains that cannabis contains about 500 different compounds, some of which—including CBD and THC—interact with certain chemical receptors in the human nervous system. But unlike THC, CBD isn’t psychoactive—meaning it doesn’t cause any kind of a high. Despite that, the US Drug Enforcement Agency classifies CBD (and other cannabis compounds) as schedule I substances, making their sale illegal in many states.
Inhibited liver function: The liver regulates the way different drugs are metabolized within the body; this process is known as hepatic drug metabolism. Higher-than-average doses of CBD oil can slow the hepatic drug metabolism process. As a result, users may not be able to process other drugs as quickly. This is particularly concerning for CBD oil users who also take prescription medications.
PPAR agonism: Agonism of PPARs (peroxisome proliferator activated receptors) may have a variety of benefits including: anticancer, neuroprotective (via removal of beta-amyloid plaques), and antipsychotic effects.  Cannabidiol bolsters PPAR-alpha signaling and simultaneously decreases inflammation.  Although PPAR agonism may not directly foster an anxiolytic effect, it cannot be ruled out as a potential synergistic contributor.
Let's start with the most officially proven medical use of CBD. Earlier this year, the FDA approved the first-ever drug containing CBD, Epidiolex, to treat two rare forms of pediatric epilepsy. To get to that point, the drug's manufacturers had to do a whole lot of randomized, placebo-controlled trials on humans. They had to study how much children could take, what would happen in case of overdose, and any possible side effects that would occur.
As of now, researchers understand that sleep is divided into multiple cycles with different phases, and it is generally regarded that CBD oil increases sleep in the third phase, which is the “deep sleep” phase. Furthermore, it has been shown that CBD decreases the duration of REM sleep, which is a phase of light sleep and is also the phase where dreams occur.
In terms of cancer, the suggestion is to have three doses of CBD oil each day, and gradually increase the amount to 1 gram per day. The full treatment is believed to take 90 days. Please note that CBD oil is still illegal in many countries, but there is a significant amount of research being done on its medical applications, and a number of reputable sources have put out guides regarding the use of CBD oil for treatment of many diseases.
Epilepsy Society believes that individuals or their parents or carers should decide whether or not to use CBD-based oils. However they should always discuss any decision with their healthcare professional and should not stop taking their epilepsy medication without the supervision of their doctor. Unlicensed CBD oils may not be produced to the same high standards as licensed products and could interact with epilepsy medication. This could increase the risk of side effects or seizures.
The family of 5-HT receptors or serotonin receptors are a group of G-protein coupled receptors. They play a big role in anxiety. These receptors bind to CBD and when activated by it, and this results in an anti-depressant effect. These receptors also work in processes such as anxiety, addiction, appetite, sleep, pain perception, nausea, vomiting, etc.
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Great Article on CBD – Did you learn anything about how the efficacy of the CBC is affected by the source species? e.g. Cannabis vs Hemp. Also, Sativa vs. Indica. All of the referenced studies just state CBC, do you know what is the typical source of CBD used in these type of studies? CBC oil from Hemp is readily and cheaply available on the internet from many companies, however I have read that the efficacy of Hemp derived CBD is less than from Cannabis. Any thoughts? Thanks!
The ratio of THC to CBD in a product is also important. Lee said products made with CBD oil extracted from resin-rich marijuana plants rather than industrial hemp, which may have no THC at all, are more therapeutic because the two ingredients work synergistically. These oils are also purer, since fewer plants are used and less refining is necessary. However, these products are available only in states with legal weed. 
Great information, my question is: Will CBD oil that is THC Free test positive on a random drug test? In my career, we have random drug test and would hate to fired for testing positive. But I suffer from anxiety, I was in the military and I have worked in crazy all over the world places. I am not sure where the anxiety came from but I am pretty much locked into my home, but now it’s gotten worst to where I can’t be home alone.
Hi. I really do believe it depends on the mg & ratio of the CBD to THC. My first try at high CBD : low THC tincture oil was with Humboldt Anthropology 16:1. I started off with 2 drops twice a day after 3 days I went to 4 drops twice a day. After a few daysof that I went up to 6 drops and then 8 drops and then 10 drops twice a day. 10 drops twice a day was a perfect dosage for me. FINALLY no pondering worries or fears from all the “what if’s”. If I didn’t want to think about something I had control over not thinking about it. It was an amazing feeling. It was complete FREEDOM. Sadly the dispensary I use no longer has the Humboldt Anthropology 16:1 tincture. Last week I moved on to my first trial with a different brand. They recommend Jayden Juice 28:1 tincture 2 to 3 drops twice a day. Very 1st dose tried 4 drops(because I was up to 10 with my other tincture) and felt weird. Kinda spaced or like a head change. Not sure if it was my tincture or the fear (my anxiety) of trying something different. Didn’t like that feeling one bit. My second dose for the day I took 2 drops. With that said I took 2 drops twice a day for a couple of days. I could feel the anxiety stirring around within me. That warm tingling feeling in my chest and arms. All the “what if” thoughts are far off in the back ground of my mind. Crazy thing because I haven’t felt that feeling in over a year while taking Humboldt Anthropology 16:1 even after the passing of our son this past Aug. As of yesterday I started 3 drops twice a day with the Jayden Juice 28:1 that I currently have. Praying that I can make this work for me. $80 for .05 oz is a tad pricey, “what if” it doesn’t work for me.

58. Rock EM, Bolognini D, Limebeer CL, et al. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of cannabis, attenuates vomiting and nausea-like behaviour via indirect agonism of 5-HT(1A) somatodendritic autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Br J Pharmacol. 2012;165:2620–2634. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01621.x. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
When medical marijuana became a thing in Seattle, before full legalization, many of my friends found relief from their darker moods with cannabis. At that time, I didn’t have a MMJ card to buy the medical stuff, but a buddy gave me some CBD oil he wasn’t using and I took it in the winter. The grey Seattle rain wasn’t getting to me anymore. I would smile a lot more and it helped me get through a serious break-up and transition in my life. I remember at the time hearing cases like this: http://seattle.cbslocal.com/2014/02/05/study-suicide-rates-fell-in-states-where-medical-marijuana-is-legal/ . How suicide rates dropped in states where medical and recreational use became legal.
Safety: As of current, there’s zero evidence to suggest that cannabidiol is unsafe and/or intolerable. While certain individuals may experience adverse effects from its administration, these adverse effects are not common and may be a result of: poor sourcing, formatting, addition of other unwanted chemicals or cannabinoids, or contamination.  Most research indicates CBD is just as safe and well-tolerated as a placebo.
I felt the same way. I had anxiety about taking CBD Oil. I have never used it before and of course, I have never even used marijuana. I was nervous that it had .3 THC in it. My husband had to keep reassuring me that it was okay for me to take. I’m as straight-laced as they come. I have an extreme type A personality. I tried it. It made me feel light headed and very sleepy. I took my second dose this morning. I honestly can’t tell that it is working. I haven’t yelled at anyone so maybe it is lol. I’ll keep taking it about maybe once a day. I don’t know about twice a day. It again, still makes me feel a tad tired. I have to function. I hope it works and is not all hype.
Hemp oil has never been as popular as other marijuana products. With little to no THC, CBD-rich strains of cannabis don’t deliver the pleasant buzz recreational users seek out in marijuana. In the 1970s, however, scientists found that cannabidiol was effective in reducing seizures. The brain’s endocannabinoid system contains receptors that respond to CBD, producing anticonvulsant effects. Being plant-derived and native to the brain’s own chemistry, CBD is therefore one of the most natural options for seizure treatment available today. Still, not many people took interest in CBD until 2013, when a CNN documentary special, Weed, hosted by the network’s chief medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, highlighted CBD’s effectiveness in combating seizures. Since then, demand for hemp oil products has exploded.

The review of evidence documented an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD in both healthy volunteers and animal models.  What’s more, CBD significantly reduced feelings of anxiety among those diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD).  Although the specific anxiolytic mechanisms of CBD aren’t fully elucidated, researchers recommend additional trials of CBD for panic disorder, OCD, social phobia, and PTSD.
Even if you live in a state where marijuana use is legal, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration still classifies the CBD extract as a Schedule 1 substance — the DEA's most restricted category. According to the agency, "Schedule I drugs, substances or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse."
At age 5, Figi’s parents, Matt and Paige Figi, had exhausted all traditional options in their quest to control the hundreds of grand mal seizures their young daughter was experiencing every day. They ultimately turned to the Stanleys, a group of brothers who grow pot in Colorado, who then developed a groundbreaking hemp-based CBD oil they dubbed “Charlotte’s Web.”
CBD does not appear to have any psychotropic ("high") effects such as those caused by ∆9-THC in marijuana, but may have anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic effects.[12] As the legal landscape and understanding about the differences in medical cannabinoids unfolds, it will be increasingly important to distinguish "medical marijuana" (with varying degrees of psychotropic effects and deficits in executive function) – from "medical CBD therapies” which would commonly present as having a reduced or non-psychoactive side effect profile.[12][57]
It is for this reason that all the finished hemp goods that you see for sale in America, from food products to clothing to building materials, are part of an imported hemp industry that has surpassed $688 million annually. The size of this import industry is one of the major catalysts for hemp legalization in the U.S. As a renewable source of a range of products, hemp provides an exciting new step in American agriculture.
Guzmán leads me around his cramped lab—centrifuges, microscopes, beakers, petri dishes, a postdoc researcher in a white smock extracting tissue from a mouse corpse pinned under bright lights. It’s your typical bioresearch lab, except that everything is devoted to the effects of cannabis on the body and brain. The lab focuses not just on cancer but also on neurodegenerative diseases and on how cannabinoids affect early brain development. On this last topic the Guzmán group’s research is unequivocal: Mice born of mothers regularly given high doses of THC during pregnancy show pronounced problems. They’re uncoordinated, have difficulty with social interactions, and have a low anxiety threshold—they’re often paralyzed with fear at stimuli, such as a cat puppet placed near their cage, that don’t upset other juvenile mice.
So Mechoulam called the Israeli national police and scored five kilos of confiscated Lebanese hashish. He and his research group isolated—and in some cases also synthesized—an array of substances, which he injected separately into rhesus monkeys. Only one had any observable effect. “Normally the rhesus monkey is quite an aggressive individual,” he says. But when injected with this compound, the monkeys became emphatically calm. “Sedated, I would say,” he recalls with a chuckle.

And the products on the shelf aren't all the same, Ward said. "There can be many, many different varieties, and if you're thinking about doing this for medical reasons, you want to find a trusted source and do your research," she said. "Where does that oil come from, and how confident can you be that you know the exact percentages of the different cannabinoids in the product?"

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Medical Disclaimer: Statements in any video or written content on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medications, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using this product. Representations regarding the efficacy and safety of CBD oil have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA only evaluates foods and drugs, not supplements like these products. These products are not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure any disease. The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any supplement program.

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